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Residency And Rip Offs In Any EU Country

Info Mode:

I’ve just been reading a very naive example of how to break EU law without realisation of doing so. Before jumping the gun, NO, this is not just about Spain. It’s an EU directive that applies to all member states and makes good sense…

The situation:

A  woman and her husband want to move here to Spain (from the UK) and have decided to rent for a year before putting down any roots. Sounds like a good idea at first, but rules and regulations state that without being employed, a non resident can only stay for 180 days…

Note,, this is a Brit renter from a Brit owner…

Visa’s are not required, but cross a border within the confines of any other country belonging to the European Union, and without being classed as breaking the law that’s all you’ve got. Only Residential Status allows an EU citizen to live in another EU country permanently. Once acquired,180 days doesn’t apply, but forever does…

Even if you own a property like we do, it’s the same rule within any calendar year… We haven’t broken that rule, and wouldn’t. After two years of flitting backwards and forwards, without going beyond the limitations. Now we’re here for good, the process of residency has begun. Yes you have to own a property and the reams of paperwork (as shown the other day) in order to apply… Proof is required that you have sufficient income to support yourself before the WELCOME mat is laid. In my own opinion, never mind the facts, I agree.

As you can imagine, “one” feels a bit miffed when someone hasn’t done their homework and expects to be treated as “a citizen without a permanent home” whilst over-staying their welcome by half a year.

But the person in question wasn’t even aware of that, she was more bothered about having paid a deposit up front, direct to the owner without going through an agency! Even worse, they only discovered afterwards they were expected to pay utility bills! But like someone else stated, those bills will come out of the owners bank account on direct debit. The owner could then state they were “paperless documents.” (Even though they can be printed out), and a naive renter could be well over charged…

Oh, some people are such fools, then Brit to Brit con, they’ll blame Spain when it all goes tits up. 

So how is the property noticed in the first place? He uses an online advertising site that has no responsibility when it comes to transactions. Legally so, because terms and conditions state they are not responsible for any interaction beyond the advert. It is not a scam, they aren’t an agent.

The guy renting out the property would know all about the rules of residency, so he is as much to blame. Except in his eyes, being onto a “real good deal” is obviously more important. It also proves the point that he’s doing this under the radar. The agency referred to by the advert, if used, would be onto it pronto. But with personal contact details also provided, (and used in this case) he doesn’t have to notify the agency, or pay any fees to them, or pay any tax to the authorities…

Using a website to look for advertised property for rent is secure. But only if someone clicks on the URL to the rental company involved, and doesn’t contact the owner directly. Even when their personal contact details are supplied… It’s the same principle anywhere…

The majority of Brits with a rental property to let are honest and don’t abuse the system, but some do. Unfortunately the few Brits who ignore the rules put the UK at the top of the list (here in Spain) when it comes to clients being ripped off.

It almost happened to us when we rented for 4 months before buying the house. We rang round a few, naively phoning the owner directly at first. Then we contacted a very nice guy who told us not to fall for any of it and to use the agent. Unfortunately his property was fully booked for the dates we wanted. However, we learned our lesson, and later discovered that sometimes there’s photos online – but no such address exists… Bypass the agent and you’re stuffed if anything goes wrong…          

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On a similar note, some property buyers are being drawn into a Residency scam, again, this happens anywhere in the EU. The property is advertised as having “Residency Included” in the price. There is no such thing.

For EU members, Residence, [here in Spain called Residencia] is a direct formal process between the home owner in their province of residence, and the “Oficina de Extranjeros.” (The Foreign Office).

This post is just one example of deviousness by just a few, with advice about how to avoid practice of it…

However, it follows on from the fact that Britain is far too soft and allows anyone in, with benefits paid. Oh the irony…

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